Top 10 Benefits of Pet Ownership for Seniors (And P.S.: American House is Pet Friendly!)

Think back to your childhood. Chances are some of your favorite memories involve your cherished family pet (or pets). Days spent playing fetch in the yard with Fido, cuddling with purring fur ball Fluffy or talking walks around the neighborhood with Rover likely make you reminisce with a smile. Well, those same warm feelings can be yours all over again!

Benefits of Pet Ownership for Seniors - American House BlogAMERICAN HOUSE IS PET FRIENDLY

Cats and dogs are wonderful additions to your life — and at American House, we understand and encourage that type of bond! Many of our communities are pet friendly, so don’t worry about bringing your furry friends along with you when you move.

Or, if you don’t already have a pet, perhaps you should consider getting one! Pets offer plenty of benefits, not the least of which is constant companionship. You’ll look forward to spending time petting your new cat or dog, and you’ll be able to relax and find comfort with your new-found friend.

The Top 10 Benefits of Pet Ownership for Seniors:

  1. Pets help lower YOUR blood pressure
  2. Animals help relieve stress
  3. Four-legged friends ease the pain of loss after a loved one passes away
  4. Pets offer security and unconditional love
  5. You’ll be more active with a pet around
  6. Furry friends provide comfort when you’re sad
  7. Those who have pets have less depression
  8. They’re a great opportunity for social interaction
  9. Pet owners have fewer doctor visits
  10. Having a pet helps you establish a routine and responsibility

AMERICAN HOUSE

We want American House to feel just like home and that includes allowing your pet to live with you, too. Call us today at (248) 579-4422 or visit www.americanhouse.com to find out which of our communities welcome pets. Then, picture all the things you and Fluffy or Fido will do here!

4 Signs That It’s Time To Move Into A Senior Living Community

Moving into a senior living community is NOT being sentenced to an “old folks” home anymore. New retirement communities are chock full of socializing and fun, enriching activities. It’s about shedding the homeowner responsibility for the freedom of living in your own place without all the constraints – and upkeep. Not sure it’s time to move, though? Go through this checklist of 4 Signs That it’s Time to Move into a Senior Living Community (and use these 5 Important Steps to Find the Best Assisted Living Community when you decide it’s time).

Signs That It's Time To Move Into A Senior Living Community1. Do days go by without any in-person interaction?

It’s lonely if you don’t have anyone at home to talk to. There’s no one to share a laugh with at a new TV show, or to take a walk around the neighborhood. Isolation isn’t healthy, especially for seniors who are dealing with the loss of a spouse. But more importantly, staying connected with others is one of the key points in How to Lead a Longer, Healthier Life (Plus 10 Longevity Tips). Moving into a senior living community allows for plenty of socialization and new friends!

2. Having a hard time with all the interior and exterior home maintenance?

Cutting the grass and shoveling snow can be a difficult task and paying someone to come over may be a headache in itself. It’s understandable. And you can forget about roof repairs or fears of the hot water heater giving out — ouch! Moving into a senior living community means that all those maintenance issues — indoor and outdoor — are taken care of for you. Less stress, more time to enjoy your abode…and decorate it with memories! Don’t forget to use these 16 Tips for Choosing a Senior Living Community  during your search!

3. Getting bored?

You don’t have to be bored! That’s one of the 10 Misconceptions about Growing Older! Luckily, senior living communities are FULL of things to do: Sports, crafts, music, food – it’s limitless. There are trips to fun events, regularly scheduled outings such as grocery shopping or doctor’s appointments and in-house programming for everyone to participate in during the week.

4. Have you fallen? More than once?

One of the good things about senior living communities is the varied level of care they’re able to provide. This means you can have easy access to a medical team and staff to take care of certain things that you may not be able to do for yourself. And if you’re at American House Senior Living Communities, we use iBalance Machines to Reduce the Risk of Falls  for residents. Need a little extra help? We’re here with you.

AMERICAN HOUSE

Deciding when to move into a senior living community can be a difficult one — but at American House Senior Living Communities, we’re here to help you through the process. Visit www.americanhouse.com to find a location near you and schedule a visit today. You can take a tour and talk to our team of caring staff members about your transition into a senior living community.

American House Joins in the Woodward Dream Cruise — And Hosts Several Community Car Shows

In Metro Detroit, we’re all about the cars — especially in August, which is highlighted by the world-famous Woodward Dream Cruise! At American House, we’re certainly jumping in on the action. How? By having our very own car shows and participating in the biggest one around.

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Did you know our American House Royal Oak residents have the unique pleasure of being able to join in the annual Woodward Dream Cruise? It’s true! With the help of Executive Director Chris Laymac, we’ll be decorating the American House bus and cruising up and down Woodward so our residents can oooh and aaah at all the classic cars.

Our residents love to reminisce about their younger years while admiring all the cars. They talk about what they drove and what their spouse drove. What are their favorites? Everyone usually loves all the convertibles — especially the men — and the younger residents seem to like the Ford Mustangs.

If you’re a car aficionado, too, you can stop by any — or all — of our car shows at several American House communities to admire the cars or bring your own for others to appreciate. Here’s a list of our American House Car Shows:

AMERICAN HOUSE CAR SHOWS

* Saturday, August 9: From 1-3 p.m. at American House Farmington Hills (24400 Middlebelt in Farmington Hills)
* Wednesday, August 13: From noon to 2 p.m. at Park Place (29250 Heritage Parkway in Warren)
Stop by for a special appearance by Elvis! There will be a 50/50 raffle, prizes for the top three cars, hot dogs, popcorn and other goodies.
* Monday, August 18: From 5-7 p.m. at American House Elmwood (2251 W. Auburn Road in Rochester Hills)
Enjoy oldies music and delicious food while checking out the classic cars!
* Thursday, August 21: From 5-7 p.m. at American House Stone & Village (This event is at Stone: 3741 South Adams Road in Rochester Hills)
We’ll be having a BBQ, refreshments, goodie bags for everyone who brings a car, music by the DJ Crashers, a 50/50 raffle, door prizes and prizes for the top three cars — plus you can ride the Big Wheel!
* Friday, August 22: From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at American House Sterling Meadows (33433 Schoenherr in Sterling Heights)
* Friday, August 29: From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at American House Southfield (27577 Lahser Road in Southfield)
* Friday, September 5: From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at American House East Two (18760 13 Mile Road in Roseville)
There will be a food tent, a 50/50 raffle and Happy DJ beats for all to enjoy.

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And while you are out enjoying all the fun, know that you are helping a GREAT cause. Proceeds benefit the American House Foundation, which partners with local nonprofit organizations to identify seniors in need in Metro Detroit.

AMERICAN HOUSE
We have plenty of unique activities and outings for our residents in addition to the adventure of the Woodward Dream Cruise! Call us today at (248) 579-4422 or visit www.americanhouse.com to schedule a tour and see for yourself why residents have so much fun.

American House Brings Music to Residents’ Ears in Many Ways

American House Music

What’s the one thing that no matter where you are, who you’re with or how old you are, can make you smile and take you back in time to a place that made you happy? Music! At American House, music is a great way to unite residents and staff and create a lasting feel-good vibe throughout the community! And, best of all, it’s known that music benefits our physical AND mental health.

Here are some of the ways American House incorporates music into life around our communities and how residents can revel in the music, too:

Join the American House Choir

We have our very own choir that residents can join — and then travel to other communities to perform! Or, just attend performances to listen to the beautiful harmonies (and sing along if it’s that kind of performance (like during one of our Christmas Carol appearances)!

Visit with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra

We’re proud to have partnered with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra to have some of the very talented musicians drop by American House to play for and interact with our residents. We’ve also taken residents to downtown Detroit to watch a DSO performance. Outstanding!

Sing on your own

You don’t have to be part of a group to get your groove on! Take it from American House resident Will, who we dubbed our own American House Idol because of his lovely ability to serenade residents with his wonderful voice! If you’ve got it in you, sing it!

Turn up the radio

You don’t need a stage, a microphone or even an audience to enjoy the benefits of music! Just turn on a radio and let the music flow until you start humming a little under your breath and dancing to the beat. You’ll be singing your heart out before you know it!

AMERICAN HOUSE

At American House, we do all we can to keep our residents happy and healthy and having fun — and music is a large part of that! Stop by an American House location close to you for a tour and you can see for yourself all the ways our residents enjoy themselves. Call us today at (248) 579-4422 or visit www.americanhouse.com to schedule your visit!

American House Residents Share Advice and Wisdom for 2014 Graduates

Wisdom for 2014 Graduates - American House Blog

Congratulations, graduates! With lots of hard work, you did it!

Whether you’re graduating from high school or college, our residents at American House Senior Living Communities wanted to share some of their wisdom with you, to help you along your next journey in life! They’ve seen a lot and have tons of life experiences to guide you.

Here’s some advice our residents would like to share withnew graduates:

“It’s a big world and it’s rough — get a good education and put your best foot forward. Stay ahead of the crowd.” -Mary Kay

Great life advice! No matter what situation you’re in, do your best and work hard to be the best YOU possible.

“If you graduate from high school and have good grades, go to college. If you don’t have good grades, learn one of the trades or go to vocational school.” -Aileen

It’s always a good idea to have a plan for your life after school.

“Always be true to your friends, because they’ll be with you for a long time.” –Rita Boyer

Your friends may just seem like someone to hang out with now, but over time, they’ll become so much more: A support system, family, networking unit, advice-givers, vacation buddies, parenting friends…the list is endless! Be good to them and they’ll be good to you.

“Go to college and become a professional now so you’ll have money when you retire.” –Elaine Meyer

Take it from someone who’s been there: Planning a way to have funds down the line means you can retire comfortably and won’t have to spend your golden years working too hard.

“Study.” –Claudia Daugustino

Isn’t that the key to success? Study: Not only for good grades, but because you want to learn a plethora of information that will guide you through your professional career – and life in general.

“You have a whole new life ahead of you – live, love, laugh and enjoy it.” –Jessie Fields

Don’t forget to take some time to stop and smell the roses! After all, what good is being in the “real world” if you can’t enjoy what you’ve earned?

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? Share it here!

AMERICAN HOUSE

Our residents have so many wonderful stories to share! Call us today at (248) 579-4422 or visit www.americanhouse.com to schedule a tour to see what it’s like — and you may even be able to listen to interesting stories from our residents about “the good old days” and more!

Celebrating National Poetry Month With Our American House Residents

April was National Poetry Month! We have a number of very talented residents who took time during the month of April to put their talents to work in creating poetry. Below are a few of our favorite selections from residents all over the Metro Detroit area. Check them out and let us know what you think!

American House Logo

“THE AMERICAN HOUSE”

By Bob Preiur of American House East Two

The American House is our new home,

While living here we’re never alone,

We have friends and staff beyond compare,

It makes our lives worth living there,

I really feel we’re part of the family,

That gets along just great and quite handily,

If ever you need help in what you do,

There’s always a friend to help you through.

Take for instance the dining room staff,

That serves our meals like a friendly task.

They never hesitate to fulfill our needs,

With a loving touch to always please.

I Thank God daily for being here,

And trust my friends will always be near,

To make my day always pleasant and warm,

With that daily thought I can handle a storm.

Keep up the good work and loving touch,

That all your tenant’s love so much,

You’re a breath of fresh air and sunshine too,

We always appreciate the things you do.

“HOME”

By Alfred P. Murphy of American House Village American House Poetry

The saying is “A house is not a home”

My American House is, just read this poem.

Living with people, a kin,

to sisters and brothers,

cared for as would be fathers and mothers.

They say that these are “The Golden Years”

I agree, with a minimum of tears and fears.

“OLD FASHIONED”

by Dolores Stanislawski of American House Dearborn Heights

Am I old fashioned because I like to see,

The old, old movies on the TV.

I like to listen to a simple song,

For the mellow music, I do long.

I like to say please and thank you,

To others who need that kindness too.

Am I old fashioned because I don’t wear my clothes so tight,

Because I try to get along and don’t fight.

I’ll let others go first in line,

I’ll tell them I don’t mind.

I let a gentleman open the door,

I even give money to the poor.

Am I old fashioned because I like my home,

Night or day I don’t like to roam.

I clean my own home, I don’t hire anyone,

What gets done-gets done.

Am I old fashioned because my hair isn’t frizzy,

I have leisure time and not too busy.

I don’t spend more money than I can make,

I refuse to pay interest so they can take.

My car isn’t new and I don’t mind,

I never needed the other kind.

Am I old fashioned because my bible I read,

Because I do unto others and plant the seed.

I always try to look clean and neat,

I never know who I will meet.

I still believe in heaven, I still believe in hell,

I want to know the bible and know it well.

You can call me old fashioned, I don’t care,

But don’t call me old, Don’t you dare.

“SPRING IS HERE”

E. Gentry of American House Hazel Park

On the map this is spring,

But outside it’s winter.

No robins to be seen or rabbits running about.

No trees have blossom out.

The sky is blue the sun is out.

I know it is spring.

“IF….”

By Nell Beare of American House Hazel Park

If I could live my life again,

What would I do over?

What changes would I like to make?

What secrets would uncover?

If I could live my life again,

I’d surely ask more questions

About my family lineage.

I’d follow the suggestions

Of people wiser than I am

Who tried to give direction.

I’d even try to benefit

From well-deserved correction.

But one thing I would not undo –

No, more than one, I tell you –

I’d marry the same loving man

And bear our lively offspring.

I’d not give up the work I love

Of teaching little children

About the saving grace of God

And how to get to heaven.

I’d try to be a better friend,

A better wife and mother.

But this is true – the years I’ve lived

Cannot be changed for other.

“THE GAL IN THE SCOOTER”

By Frances Wigton of American House Riverview

The gal in the Scooter with the pretty red hair

Is always on call as she flits here and there.

Bob, her trusty side-kick, is at her beck-and-call;

The two of them together seem to have a ball.

They make “assisted living” seem like so much fun

With their testimonial video on “americanhouse.com”.

Model boats and string art keeps them occupied,

And now they are teaching others in their classes on the side.

They finished and furnished a doll house to the amazement of us all

From the carpet on the floor to the picture of Bob on the wall.

They oversee Bingo and play cards at night.

Their Scooters on Fort Street are a very familiar sight.

At American House Assisted Living, they’re someone we all know.

The red-haired gal in the Scooter and her 96 year old side-kick Romeo.

“ASSISTED LIVING”

By Frances Wigton of American House Riverview

No more loneliness, no more fear

You’re in assisted living; be glad you’re here.

No more lawn to mow, no more dirty dishes,

And, there is always someone to grant your wishes.

When you reach our age, there is not much choice

So, don’t complain, and save your voice,

Just sit back and enjoy the ride

Over the hill to the other side.

Don’t look back and bemoan your fate;

You can’t live your life over no matter how great.

What matters now is what lies ahead

So make the most of it; at least you’re not dead.

Put on a smile, and look around you;

The people you meet are sure to astound you.

It can only get better whatever you do;

Keep looking up; it is up to you.

AMERICAN HOUSE

At American House, we’re committed to enriching the lives of our residents with activities like creative writing and poetry reading. Call us today at (248) 579-4422 or visit www.americanhouse.com to schedule a tour and find out about the exciting opportunities we can offer to your loved ones.

American House Resident Leads Active, Purposeful Lifestyle at 102

Here at American House, we pride ourselves on having a robust and active schedule of activities and events for our residents. American House Hazel Park Resident Pastor Payne goes above and beyond the meaning of staying active as the community’s 102-year-old Pastor, choir member, avid reader and licensed driver.

American House Blog - About Pastor Payne

American House resident Pastor Payne

Pastor Payne, born Eunice Payne February 27, 1912, was renamed Leo Adkins Payne several years later. However, to the residents and staff at his home of American House Hazel Park, he is simply known as Pastor Payne – the community’s leader of bible study and provider of what Pastor Payne calls “spiritual food.”

Becoming The Pastor

Pastor Payne was not always a pastor. Originally from Greenville, Alabama, the potential of a better life and education brought Pastor Payne to Detroit in 1941. In 1942, he began working for Ford Motor Company as a checker and packer. Thirty years later, Pastor Payne left the company to pursue his true passion.

“I love people very much,” says Pastor Payne. “It is in my heart to preach and teach, but I was reluctant to face the congregation.”

Pastor Payne underwent public speaking training and gained the confidence he needed to preach. In 1958, Pastor Payne organized his first church at 24 E. Nevada in Detroit where he grew the congregation as pastor for 47 years.

Coming to American House

Pastor Payne first became acquainted with the Hazel Park community by coming regularly to visit one of his members. Pastor Payne would have bible study with his member and, in doing so, became familiar with his future home.

“Moving to American House was one of the best choices I’ve ever made,” says Pastor Payne.

In August 2011, the current pastor of the community approached Pastor Payne with a request to lead Bible study. He accepted and, two and a half years later, continues to faithfully lead bible study sessions on the first and third Mondays of each month.

Pastor Payne describes the experience as very rewarding. “Many senior citizens had church homes, and many of them aren’t able to go – this fills a void. Nothing else will really satisfy them but spiritual food.”

Staying active, staying well

In addition to serving as community pastor, Pastor Payne enjoys participating in the American House Choir, which regularly performs across Southeastern Michigan. The choir is composed of more than 70 talented American House residents with a passion for music, which Pastor Payne enjoys very much.

Pastor Payne recently acquired his driver’s license at the age of 100, and still drives occasionally. Payne can drive and read without problem and enjoys reading the local paper to stay up-to-date and well-informed on current events and politics.

AMERICAN HOUSE

At American House, we’re committed to a whole person wellness for each resident. Call us today at (248) 579-4422 or visit www.americanhouse.com to schedule a tour and find out about the exciting activities and events we offer to your loved ones.

American House Honors Our Own Tuskegee Airman

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Tuskegee Airman, Lt. Col. Washington Ross, an American House Resident

At American House, we’re fortunate to have a whole lot of history behind our doors! We even have our very own Tuskegee Airman, Lt. Col. Washington Ross. Ross, who lives at American House Southfield Senior Living, always knew he wanted to be a pilot. He was born in Mississippi, the fourth son in a family of five children, and then spent his youth in Kentucky.

In the 1930s, Lt. Col. Ross said there were barnstormers who went around Kentucky, city to city, with their Ford Trimotor planes. One Sunday, these barnstormers came to his city and offered rides on the planes — for a penny per pound! So, Lt. Col. Ross paid his fare, went up in the air and was instantly smitten.

“I told my parents if I ever got the opportunity to be a pilot, I was going to take that opportunity,” Lt. Col. Ross said. And he did.

At American House, we love honoring our residents who are veterans – and we have quite a few!

FLIGHT TRAINING

In 1936, Lt. Col. Ross was a freshman in college and decided to join a program at the university to learn to fly — because the country couldn’t legally train military pilots since it was not in the war yet. He earned his pilot’s license and, although he received word from Washington, D.C. in 1940 that he was to report for the draft, he still had one year left of school and got a deferment — because he didn’t want to go to war.

After completing school, Lt. Col. Ross began teaching and noticed a sign for aviation training over in Tuskegee, Ala. So he went there and got his training.

“I wanted to be a fighter pilot,” he said. He knew that if he was drafted, he didn’t want to be with the infantry on the ground, plowing through the mud all the time. He wanted to fly.

FIGHTER PILOT

In 1943, Lt. Col. Ross graduated and became part of the 332d fighter group — which moved him to Selfridge Air National Guard Base. His first assignment was to patrol the harbor in Naples, Italy. He flew a P-47, an aircraft with eight machine guns on it. He said this was the plane he liked most to fly for actual fighting.

“You didn’t need to use your gun sight,” he said. “If you got on those Germans’ tails, you’d just start shooting and you were bound to hit it.”

In all, Lt. Col. Ross flew 63 missions in World War II. He flew P-40, P-39, P-47, P-51 and B-25 aircraft.

“My aim was to fly my missions and come home,” he said. “I only fired my gun one time.”

He was fighting for 11 months and then the war ended. He spent 20 years in the Air Force and joined the reserves, retiring from the reserves in 1981. During this time, Lt. Col. Ross also taught in the Detroit Public Schools for 29 years until he retired in 1984. Following that, he spent time talking to schools about his experiences in the Air Force and as a fighter pilot.

Lt. Col. Ross remembers there was a high-ranking government official who said, “blacks would never fly,” and when questioned why, said, “because they’re too dumb.” Pressure was put on Congress and the rules changed, and Lt. Col. Ross was able to see his dream of flight fulfilled.

THE TUSKEGEE AIRMEN

In the early part of the 1970s, Lt. Col. Ross said he and three of his comrades formed the Detroit chapter of the Tuskegee Airman. His wife was also part of the Tuskegee Air Force, Lt. Col. Ross said, as a secretary — because for every pilot, there was at least 10 other people who supported them and composed the group as well.

Our very own Tuskegee Airman had four children — one girl and three boys — with his wife. We are honored to have Lt. Col. Ross at American House, sharing his bit of history with us.

AMERICAN HOUSE

We love to hear the stories our residents at American House have to tell! Call us today at (248) 579-4422 or visit www.americanhouse.com to schedule a tour and talk to our residents yourself.

4 ways to keep your senior loved ones looking – and feeling – their best

Just because they’re not in their 20s anymore doesn’t mean your senior relatives shouldn’t still be looking their best, right? When you look good, you feel good — so here are some tips on how to help keep your senior loved ones look stylish all year long!

1. Give a manicure.

manicureYour mom or grandma may not have the dexterity in her hands that she used to and it might be awkward and/or painful for her to paint her nails. Pick out a pretty polish (ask her what she likes or become a stealth observer the next time you visit her). Then, gather up your manicure tools: Nail polish remover, cotton balls, cotton swabs (for any off-the-nail messes), nail file and clippers. The next time you visit, spend some quality girl time doing her nails!

It will give you a great opportunity to talk up a storm! (Be sure to read these Conversation Starter Tips for Your Senior Loved Ones to have some topics ready to go.) TIP: Men enjoy having their nails cut and shaped, too! Just ask!

2. Cut, color, style.

You’re probably not a hairdresser (even if you are, keep reading!) but you can still help keep your loved one’s hair looking good. If your lovely lady or gentleman has a stylist they already treasure, go and get a gift certificate. Or, you can put some cash in an envelope (lovingly decorated, if you so choose) and hand it over with the express direction that it be used on a day of pampering at the hair salon.

3. Shop ‘til you drop.

shoppingbagsClothes make the man (or woman), right? If your senior loved one has a birthday coming up, or there’s a special holiday or event on the agenda, be sure to stop by and offer to take him or her shopping for some new clothes. Whether you pay or not, going shopping together is a great way to lift both of your spirits while you spend time together. But what if your loved one isn’t up for walking around the big stores and shopping malls for a few hours? Then bring the mall to them! There’s this great thing called the Internet, where you can browse tons of clothes in a fraction of the time – boot up your laptop or tablet and start shopping!

4. Bring on the skin care regimen.

Men and women experience dry and dull skin at any age, so help your loved ones brighten up their skin! Stock up on their favorite facial moisturizer, hand cream, body lotion and foot cream and they’ll start to experience that glowing skin all year long. For the ladies, try a special scented body lotion, or even some lavender-scented creams to help promote calmness and relaxation. Don’t forget a simple, but deluxe, face wash and body wash that your loved ones probably wouldn’t purchase.

VISIT AMERICAN HOUSE

At American House, we’re committed to helping our residents feel and look good! Call us today at (248) 579-4422 or visit www.americanhouse.com to schedule a tour and find out all the exciting activities and amenities we offer for your loved ones.

6 Resolutions That Will Change Your Life

new-year-resolution2Tired of making the same resolutions year after year — and then losing your steam by the time Groundhog Day hits? Instead, try making resolutions that are just easy and basic changes geared toward improving your daily life and making you a better person. Don’t think of these as resolutions; think of them as opportunities to incorporate something new and better into your world! Here are our 6 Resolutions that Will Change Your Life:

1. A new skill I want to learn.

Have you wanted to be able to knit scarves for Christmas presents or build a new patio? Maybe you’d like to grow a beautiful garden or entertain your friends and family with a spectacular harmonica performance. Either way, now is the perfect time to take up a new hobby.

2. One way I will help others.

We all want to make a difference in someone else’s life, but it may be difficult to determine the best way to do so. Whether it’s donating your time to your favorite cause, helping your friend fix things around the house or shoveling the walkway for your neighbor: Pick one way you can help someone else — and you may be surprised at how it snowballs!

3. At least one book I will read.

Reading that book you’ve thought about opening for some time now is a great way to enrich your mind. Jumping into the world of literature can relax you and transport your mind anywhere you want to go. Don’t have a book in mind? Head to the library and ask the librarian for recommendations. You won’t be sorry!

4. A bad habit I will break.

Quitting smoking, putting an end to complaining or stopping overeating are quite popular New Year’s resolutions. If you view them as a bad habit to break instead of something to “keep,” it’ll be easier to make the change.

5. A healthy habit I will start.

How can you better yourself? Start by implementing something positive! Try incorporating more healthy food choices, practicing some Tai Chi daily OR writing in a journal before bedtime. Pick something that’s good for YOU: Your mind, body or soul.

6. A new food I will try.

Resolutions don’t have to be difficult changes! Are you anti-green vegetables? Have you always avoided any “fancy” food that you didn’t grow up eating — or are you afraid to try dishes or cuisines? Make a promise to try a new food this year. And once you try that food, well, maybe you’ll decide you want to try all kinds of other foods, too!

RESOLVE TO VISIT AMERICAN HOUSE

At American House, we work hard at bringing out the best in our residents — and offering plenty of activities for them to showcase their talents! Give us a call today at (248) 579-4422 to schedule a tour as part of YOUR New Year’s resolution!