How To Be A Lifelong Learner

One of the keys to longevity is to seek learning opportunities that challenge your mind. We know you’ve learned A LOT in your life, but there’s always room for more. Not sure what to learn about? If you have access to a computer with Internet, you have an entire WORLD of learning at your fingertips!

Here are some ideas on How to be a Lifelong Learner using online resources:

A COLLEGE DEGREE

Is one of your life goals to earn a college degree — but maybe you’ve given up hope of achieving it? Don’t! It’s never too late! You may have heard the University of Phoenix commercials on the radio or watched them on TV, but did you know YOU can enroll and start earning credits toward a degree…at ANY age? It’s true. There are plenty of online college courses now that anyone can enroll in, whether you want a degree or just the knowledge gained.

How To Be A Lifelong Learner - American House BlogLEARN A NEW LANGUAGE

Hola! Bonjour! Guten tag! Ni hao! In how many languages can you say “hello?” Well, if you want to learn how to say even more popular words and phrases — and even converse in another language — look no further than your computer. If you want to learn how to say a simple phrase, just search for “Google translate” in your search bar. You simply type a word, pick what language you’d like it translated to, and viola — it will appear.

Even if you’d like a more thorough immersion into a language, that’s available, too. There are online courses, YouTube videos and DVDs to order so you can learn at home, at your own pace. You can even gather a few friends and have a weekly language lesson! Spice things up by making a cultural day of it, including snacks, clothing and music from the country whose language you are learning. Fun AND educational!

SEW, KNIT OR CROCHET

If you’ve always wanted to make yourself a cute and cozy hat, give some homemade scarves to your loved ones for holiday or birthday gifts, or even lovingly create an heirloom blanket for that new baby in your life, now’s your chance! Whatever you want to make, chances are there’s a YouTube video to help you through each step.

All you have to do is type in “How to make a scarf: YouTube” into your favorite search engine (or on the YouTube page) and dozens of results will come up. You may have to watch a few of them to see which one is the best for your skill level and design needs, but you’ll be on your way to creating something lovely — and learning a new skill — in no time.

LEARN ABOUT BUSINESS, MENTAL HEALTH, BODY LANGUAGE AND MORE

Have you ever heard of TED Talks? TED is a nonprofit geared toward spreading information via powerful speakers. You can watch thousands of different talks online, on a myriad of subjects.

Visit www.ted.com to see their full overview. Browse through and watch videos on technology, entertainment, design, business and global issues. Or, if you’re looking for a particular subject matter (like “How I Beat Stage Fright”), type that and “TED Talks” into your search bar and see what pops up.

The things you learn will surely make great conversation topics when you meet up with your friends!

HOW TO BE A LIFELONG LEARNER AT AMERICAN HOUSE

At American House, our residents never stop learning! We have plenty of opportunities for learning new skills and more with the activities we plan. Call us today at (248) 579-4422 to schedule a tour and see all the benefits life at American House has to offer!

5 Tips To Keep Seniors Safe From Fraud and Scams

Unfortunately, there are people out there hoping to take advantage of the kindness of senior citizens. But don’t worry, with these 5 Tips to Keep Seniors Safe from Fraud and Scams, your loved ones can learn how to protect themselves and avoid being scammed.

1. Don’t ever give personal information in response to an email.

The amazing thing about technology is that anyone can make a pretty close duplicate of anything online — meaning there could be a fake website and email that looks EXACTLY like the real one, except you can’t tell at first glance. That’s why you never want to respond to an email with any personal information; even if the email looks like it’s from your cable company/financial institution/health care provider/etc. No bank or other reputable company will ask you to give personal information in an email.

Tips To Keep Seniors Safe From Fraud and Scams2. Don’t trust links sent to you.

On that same note, don’t click on a link from an email and enter your personal information on that website you’re sent to — because it could be a fake site. This is especially true when you come across something on social media. It bears repeatingthat scammers create scams to “phish” for information from you. They’ll make you think you’re at a real website, but when you enter your personal information — bank account number, Social Security number, etc. — it leads straight to the scammer who now can use that information fraudulently. If in doubt, open a new window and perform a search for the business, then go to their website from there (and make sure the web address starts with “https” when entering personal information; the “s” means secure).

3. If it sounds too good to be true, it is. You’re not being given a million dollars just because.

Haven’t entered a sweepstakes or the lottery? Then you didn’t win one. And unless you actually have family across the pond, some lovely person in Nigeria doesn’t need you to help them transfer money (with a huge reward payment for you for doing so). Sure, sometimes people are lucky. If someone really wants to give you money, they will — no strings attached. Don’t ever give out any personal information (including bank details) to someone who says you’ll get tons of money in return.

4. Trust your gut.

If alarm bells are ringing in your head and your instincts are telling you something isn’t right, trust that feeling. Even if you may not be able to specifically pinpoint what seems amiss. Your grandson Johnny is calling and asking you to wire him money to Portugal — but you swear that doesn’t sound like him and you really didn’t think he was out of the country? Yeah, it’s probably not him. Call his mom or talk to someone else before sending him any money.

5. Don’t give personal information to anyone who calls you. Even to “verify” or for “security purposes.”

If you didn’t call them, you cannot be certain the person is really who they say they are. They could be posing as an insurance adjuster, relative, utility employee or someone else who “needs” your bank account number/Social Security number/other personal information.

This includes NOT giving out your address, your middle name, your last name, your maiden name, etc. If they are calling you from the company they say they are, they will have all that information at their disposal. If, however, you do call them at a trusted number, you can give out your security codes if necessary — without revealing all of your personal information.

AMERICAN HOUSE

At American House, your loved ones are taken care of. We talk to our residents about scams they may encounter, because we want to keep them safe in all matters — such as with these 5 Tips to Keep Seniors Safe from Fraud and Scams. Visit us today at www.americanhouse.com to find a community near you and schedule a visit!